Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 1

sol H, 2012, 35×35 cm

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 2

sol H, detail

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 3

sol 13, 2013, 35×28 cm

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 4

sol 16, 2013, 75×60 cm

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 5

sol 43, 2013, 85×70 cm

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 6

sol 56, 2013, 47×40 cm

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 7

sol 15, 2013, 67×50 cm

Conrad Jon Godly’s Mountain Paintings Drip from the Canvas 8

tony wuethrich satellite, zürich When looking at Swiss painter Conrad Jon Godly’s mountainous paintings, it takes a moment to truly appreciate the incredible skill behind what seems to be such an effortless application of paint. Up close the landscapes appear to be a thick, almost random mix of blue, white and black, the result oils mixed with turpentine to create a thick impasto that Godly often leaves dripping from the canvas. Take a few steps back (or just squint your eyes a bit) and miraculously you might as well be looking at a photograph of the Swiss Alps. It’s a visual trick that the artist has perfected in both small and large-scale paintings over the last few years. Godly studied as a painter at the Basel School of Art from 1982 until 1986, but then worked as a professional photographer for 18 years. He only returned to painting in 2007 and it would seem his photographic work has had a subtle influence on his abstract painting. The artist most recently had exhibitions at Gallery Luciano Fasciati and Tony Wuethrich Gallery in Switzerland, and you can see many more paintings on his website. (via OEN, A Wash of Black)

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